TJ Kastning

If you wanted an integrated turn signal for your R6 in the last few years you could plan on spending between $50-$70. Now it seems that mass production (and the R6 hasn’t changed much in six years) has driven the price down to a much more reasonable $29.00. These are the same (essentially) integrated signals that I reviewed earlier here: http://r6blog.com/motodynamics-integrated-taillight-review/.

Now you can buy them super cheap. Good things come to those who wait!

Smoked Integrated Taillight on Amazon

 When I got home today there was an exciting package waiting for me. Inside I knew there was a beautiful integrated tail light from www.motodynamic.com. This is a good looking tail light! As I pull it out of the packaging the attention to detail is instantly obvious. All the plastic lines are crisp, the plastic is well smoked but not overly so, and the microprocessor is discreetly tucked away as not to interfere with the light. I can’t wait to get this installed.

The two features I love about the Motodynamics Integrated Taillight is the three quick flashes when braking and the sequential turn signals.

Since I am upgrading from the Clear Alternatives I am well aware that the closeness of the signals makes it harder for nearby drivers to quickly tell which direction I am signaling. The progressive signals make that much more obvious by systematically lighting the signal outwards which almost gives the light a wave look.

If there is one thing motorcyclists need to worry about in stop and go traffic it’s getting rear ended. I watch every car coming up behind me just to ensure I don’t end up as some F5000 Double Deluxe Duty’s morning snack. The Motodynamics Taillight helps warn incoming drivers you are there by blinking the brake light three quick times before going to solid red. Now instead of manually blinking my brakes I can pump a few times and know a very obvious brake light is flashing.

Motodynamics got the idea of sequential signals from traffic signals that inform drivers they need to change lanes. The signal is recognizable and obvious. Every cager will be able to to see and recognize it.

Installation is no different than any other taillight and the instructions included were far superior to the Clear Alternatives model I had previously installed. Essentially all you are going to do is:

  • Remove the rear fairing.
  • Pull out the old taillight and unplug it.
  • Install the new light being sure to match the correct left and right turn signal to the appropriate wire. This is done by turning on your left turn signal and making sure the attached wire triggers the left signal on the taillight.
  • Reinstall fairing

It didn’t take me more than 45 minutes to install it slowly.

When you install your tail light it is also a great opportunity to add or remove the rear foot pegs. Removing foot pegs gives the bike a much cleaner look if you don’t carry passengers often.

Smoked Integrated Taillights on Amazon

RIDE SAFE!

This doesn’t even deserve much of a write up. Yamaha is getting lazy. The 2012 Yamaha R6 features BOLD NEW GRAPHICS!!! and that’s about it.  It’s been essentially the same bike for six years now. Yes, it handles well. But come on!

The R1 video trumpets how Yamaha has won AMA, WSBK, and MotoGP with their bikes recently. OH REALLY!? Where is the trickle down tech? Who cares if you win and your street bikes don’t improve? Isn’t that the point?

Same R1, same R6. At least the pictures the released will make good backgrounds.

I would like to remind Yamaha that they made this commercial once upon a time.

Here you can see a gallery of the 2012 Yamaha R6 and the bold new graphics.

Help this guy out folks. I’m not an expert but I know there are people on here who are.
I saw your page on facebook and have been looking around for help, I’d really appreciate it. I own a 1999 R6 that I am having problems with, and would appreciate the help. To start off, I am having major problems with the bike to ignite, It just keeps getting worse, it idles but it takes many tries before it actually starts, recently, I tried somany times it killed my battery cause it wouldnt start.. If i dont ride for a week or longer my battery dies. Recently I borrowed a battery from a buddy of mine with a bike, and my bike started up fine with his battery.
Second when the bike is on, my headlights are dim, once I accelerate they brighten up alot more.. what Im more worried about though its the whole starting problem.. Its a big problem to me.. What do you think this problem is? I have been trying to do some research and it seems to be pointing towards a stator or voltage regulator problem.. I WOULD GREATLY APPRECIATE THE HELP!!!
I recommended this but I know I don’t know enough:

First off you need to know I’m not a Yamaha mechanic. All the knowledge I have comes from working on my 2006 R6 and I never experienced trouble such as yours.

From what your telling me it sounds like you have a bad battery. A new battery with a Battery Tender 021-0123 Battery Tender Junior 12V Battery Charger sounds like it should cure those problems. But I don’t know for sure.

If the battery is good then I can’t imagine another problem other than the stator, which is essentially an alternator.

What do you fellow riders think?

I’m not sure what the plan was, but it doesn’t go so well. Fortunately he got away with a broken wrist.

Colin is obviously very passionate about his R6 and riding. His 2007 R6 sports an Ackrapovic slip on with removed baffles, integrated turn signals with resistors for a slower flash rate, and a disconnected EXUP. The pipe sound is a treat! even better with the baffles out, it was pretty simple to fit. Disconnect the EXUP valve, remove the old muffler, and slipp the new one on. Simple as that, it looks the biz!

The lighting set up was bought from D2moto.com in the USA at a cost of $60. Once again fairly simple to fit, everything that was needed was supplied. Colin opted to upgrade the resistors that are needed to slow the flash rate down. “My fave mod has to be the lights on mine, probably because I’ve not seen another R6 with them on! I must be the first!”  As you can see he has also done away with the rear indicators.

Colin and his mates (Remember this is the UK… They talk… Different ) like nothing more than getting out on the bikes on weekends and doing a few hundred miles. Every year they go over to Northern Ireland for the Northwest 200 Motorcycle races. Often on race days they go out riding on some brilliant twisty roads.

Unfortunately Colin has not had the privilege of running his beloved machine at a track due to limited track days from noise pollution regulation. Further tracks would require extensive travel.

In Britain it’s not such an easy thing to get an R6 when you’re young. The testing is more rigorous than in the USA and only after riding safely for a number of years can you ride an unrestricted, full power motorcycle. You can ride up to a 125cc on a provisional license before you have passed the test and are restricted to 33 BHP in larger bikes for two years after the test. Of course, Colin has been riding for quite a while and has no need for a stinking BHP restrictor! Some say he is the Stig! All we know is that blue Yamaha 2007 R6 is worthy of Bike of the Week. Congrats Colin!

Remember, to submit your bike for Bike of the Week and compete for Bike of the Month just email lots of details, pictures, and videos to admin@r6blog.com.

Left Indicator (Large)

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Ride safe fellow R6’ers!